NBC reporter’s tweet about COVID breakthrough cases causes Twitter storm

By Matt Collins Article may include affiliate links

An NBC reporter is under fire for a misleading tweet headline that fails to put the number of “breakthrough” COVID cases in context.

NBC News’ Ken Dilanian tweeted “Exclusive: At least 125,000 vaccinated Americans tested positive for Covid” July 30, 2021, along with a link to a full story by Laura Strickler.

In the preview of the article below, the headline was a bit tamer: “Breakthrough Covid cases: Data shows how many vaccinated..” appeared as the truncated headline for desktop users, along with text clearly stating the data shows that 125,000 figure is only 0.08% of the 164.2 fully vaccinated Americans.

However, there’s always the question of who reads behind the “first” headline — and the effects that 125,000 figure could have as Americans start slinging it around in conversation and debate online and in person without understanding the full context.

Dilanian was called out on Twitter by multiple users for emphasizing misleading and dangerous information at a time when vaccine hesitancy and anti-vaccine movements are be fueled by “data,” many of which are false or taken out of context.

None of the data Dilanian was factually inaccurate and Strickler’s article gave more context to the story.

Coronavirus vaccines and boosters are highly recommended by multiple public health officials and experts. COVID-19 vaccines and boosters have undergone extensive testing and monitoring to ensure their safety. Scientific research has shown the vaccines and boosters to be very safe and highly effective in decreasing the likelihood of contracting the illness and, if one does become sick, symptoms are less severe and less likely to lead to hospitalization or death. For more information about COVID-19 and coronavirus, visit the CDC website. You can locate a free vaccination site or clinic near you at Vaccines.gov. As with any medical decision, you should always discuss your options with your doctor.