Hoda Kotb tests positive for coronavirus, says she’s ‘feeling good’

By Matt Collins Article may include affiliate links

Today” co-anchor Hoda Kotb has tested positive for coronavirus and isolating at home as her show kicks off a day of coverage marking the one year anniverasry of the Capitol insurrection.

Kotb says she is fully vaccinated and boosted and “feeling good.”

On Thursday, Jan. 6, 2021’s “Today,” which was billed as a special edition for coverage of the 2021 January 6 Capitol insurrection, the network had Savannah Guthrie split anchoring from Washington, D.C. and Craig Melvin in for Kotb in Studio 1A.

It’s not immediately clear when Kotb will be back or she will attempt to anchor from home.

Kotb is now the third high profile NBC talent to test positive in recent weeks, with “Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon revealing he tested positive just before the holidays. Seth Meyers, host of “Late Night,” tested positive Jan. 4, 2021.

Both were also fully vaccinated and boosted and Fallon reported only mild symptoms.

The positive results come as the omicron variant spreads rapidly throughout the U.S., with health experts warning it likely more easily evades vaccinate protection but also tends to have less severe symptoms, particularly in those who are vaccinated and received boosters.

Those who remain unvaccinated remain at significantly higher risk of contracting the disease, showing symptoms, ending up in the hospital and dying.

Even those who do survive risk overwhelming the U.S. health system, which is already seen massive increases in hospitalizations as omicron spreads following a holiday season full of travel and indoor gatherings.

Coronavirus vaccines and boosters are highly recommended by multiple public health officials and experts. COVID-19 vaccines and boosters have undergone extensive testing and monitoring to ensure their safety. Scientific research has shown the vaccines and boosters to be very safe and highly effective in decreasing the likelihood of contracting the illness and, if one does become sick, symptoms are less severe and less likely to lead to hospitalization or death. For more information about COVID-19 and coronavirus, visit the CDC website. You can locate a free vaccination site or clinic near you at Vaccines.gov. As with any medical decision, you should always discuss your options with your doctor.